DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3291.ijcp20213724

Comparison of the proportion of overweight and obesity using 2015 Indian Academy of Pediatrics and WHO body mass index charts among 5-18 years old children attending a tertiary care centre in South Kerala

Jose P. Cyril, Baburaj Stephenson, Bobby Christy, Roshan Sabu, Axina Ali, Silpa Mariyam John

Abstract


Background: Childhood obesity is associated with impaired health during childhood and it is a risk factor for later adult diseases if left untreated. There is a rising trend of over nutrition in developing countries including India. Hence the present study has been envisaged to estimate the proportion of overweight/obesity among 5-18 years old children of a tertiary care centre in South Kerala. The objective of this study was to compare the proportion of overweight and obesity using 2015 Indian Academy of Paediatrics and WHO BMI charts among 5-18 years old children attending a tertiary care centre in South Kerala.

Methods: After getting ethical committee clearance this cross-sectional study was conducted among children between 5 and 18 years of age in the department of paediatrics of a tertiary care centre in South Kerala, during the period between August 2018-October 2020. The BMI was plotted and analysed with appropriate software.

Results: Among the 250 children the proportion of obesity and overweight was 88 (35.2%) by IAP standards, 63 (25.2%) by WHO standards. The highest proportion of obesity was found in children aged between 7-8.5 years 17 (38.6%). There was a statistically significant association between age and BMI status (p value<0.001).

Conclusions: IAP BMI standards are more suitable for Indian children to identify the proportion of overweight and obesity than WHO standards. Also, this study alerts us to concentrate more on the age group between 7-10.5 years for early prevention of childhood obesity and overweight.

 


Keywords


Childhood, Overweight, Obesity, Body mass index, World Health Organization, Indian Academy of Paediatrics

Full Text:

PDF

References


WHO. Childhood overweight and obesity, 2020. Available at: https://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/childhood/en/. Accessed on 04 September 2021.

WHO. What is overweight and obesity?, 2020. Available at: https://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/childhood_what/en/. Accessed on 04 September 2021.

WHO. Obesity and overweight, 2020. Available at: https://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/childhood_what/en/. Accessed on 04 September 2021.

National Health Mission. GUIDELINES FOR RKSK, 2021. Available at: http://nhm.gov.in/index1.php?lang=1&level=3&sublinkid=1020&lid=153. Accessed on 04 September 2021.

WHO. Nutrition - Adolescent obesity and related behaviours (2002–2014), 2020. Available at: https://www.euro.who.int/en/healthtopics/diseasepr20022014. Accessed on 04 September 2021.

WHO. Obesity: preventing and managing the global epidemic, 2020. Available at: https://www.euro.who.int/en/healthtopics/diseasepr,-20022014. Accessed on 04 September 2021.

WHO. Sixty-sixth World Health Assembly, Geneva, 2020. Available at: https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665. Accessed on 04 September 2021.

Ranjani H, Mehreen TS, Pradeepa R, Anjana RM, Garg R, Anand K, et al. Epidemiology of childhood overweight & obesity in India: A systematic review. Indian J Med Res. 2016;143(2):160-74.

Haq I, Raja MW, Ahmad MM. A comparison of the 2015 Indian Academy of Pediatrics, International Obesity Task Force and World Health Organization growth references among 5–18-year-old children. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health. 2017;1814-9.

Khadilkar VV, Khadilkar AV. Revised Indian Academy of Pediatrics 2015 growth charts for height, weight and body mass index for 5-18-year-old Indian children. Indian J Endocrinol Metab. 2015;19(4):470-6.

WHO. WHO Steps surveillance manual : the WHO Stepwise approach to chronic disease risk factor surveillance/Noncommunicable Diseases and Mental Health, World Health Organization, 2020. Available at: https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/. Accessed on 04 September 2021.

Indian Academy of Pediatrics Growth Charts Committee, Khadilkar V, Yadav S, Agrawal KK, Tamboli S, Banerjee M, et al. Revised IAP growth charts for height, weight and body mass index for 5- to 18-year-old Indian children. Indian Pediatr. 2015;52(1):47-55.

WHO. WHO BMI-for-age (5-19 years), 2020. Available at: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/waystomeasure-body-fat. Accessed on 04 September 2021.

Healthline. The 10 Best Ways to Measure Your Body Fat Percentage, 2020. Available at: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/waystomeasure-body-fat. Accessed on 04 September 2021.

Eshwar TK, Chudasama RK, Eshwar ST, Thakrar D. Prevalence of obesity and overweight and their comparison by three growth standards among affluent school students aged 8-18 years in Rajkot. Indian J Public Health. 2017;61(1):51-4.

Jain S, Pant B, Chopra H, Tiwari R. Obesity among adolescents of affluent public schools in Meerut. Indian J Public Health. 2010;54(3):158-60.

Kumaravel V, Shriraam V, Anitharani M, Mahadevan S, Balamurugan AN, Sathiyasekaran BW. Are the current Indian growth charts really representative? Analysis of anthropometric assessment of school children in a South Indian district. Indian J Endocrinol Metab. 2014;18(1):56-62.

Maiti S, De D, Ali KM, Bera TK, Ghosh D, Paul S. Overweight and obesity among early adolescent school girls in urban area of west bengal, India: prevalence assessment using different reference standards. Int J Prev Med. 2013;4(9):1070-4.

Chandra N, Anne B, Venkatesh K, Teja G D, Katkam SK. Prevalence of childhood obesity in an affluent school in Telangana using the recent IAP growth chart: A pilot study. Indian J Endocr Metab. 2019;23:428-32.